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New Sheffield Connect city centre bus service

A new bus service connecting 12 stops in and around Sheffield City Centre has launched today, providing residents and visitors the opportunity to hop onto the bus from the train, tram or other bus services. The buses will be available 7 days a week to cover the main shopping times and when footfall is highest, with a regular service throughout the day. Councillor Terry Fox, Leader of Sheffield City Council, said: ‘This service will be a huge asset to the city. I know it’s something our city centre businesses and the public have been waiting for and I’m really pleased to say it’s here. With the cost of living crisis and well-publicised issues with public transport, we’re taking action into our own hands, putting Sheffield first to provide much-needed transport for those who really need it. ‘Access in and around the city will be much easier. We’ve ensured the bus is fully accessible with priority disabled seating at the front and the service has been designed with air quality and Clean Air Zone (CAZ) in mind. It will provide a safe route for travellers while the improvement works are going on in our city centre. ‘It will help support active travel into the city and make a real difference to those who work, live in, and visit Sheffield’ To make sure the service started running as soon as possible, a Diesel Euro VI bus is being used first, followed by an electric bus once the funding is confirmed. The Diesel vehicle is compliant with the Clean Air Zone. Following consultation, the £200k spend for this, agreed in May 2022, will come from the Council’s Share of the South Yorkshire Mayoral Combined Authority’s “Mayor’s Sustainable Transport Fund”. The route and timetable could adapt over time as Sheffield City Council monitors passenger numbers to determine how the service is working for everyone. Expansion to other destinations will be considered in line with city centre developments and feedback from businesses and the community. The planned route has 12 stops and will be free to people with a valid travel pass, or £1 without a pass: South Pennines Community Transport will operate the service. View the Sheffield Connect route and timetable

Posted on 1st August 2022

by Sheffield City Council

Bus journeys on key commuter routes made quicker under new plans

Plans to improve reliability and journey time for public transport on Abbeydale Road and Ecclesall Road have been launched today. The Connecting Sheffield proposals would give buses priority along the two key bus routes. The launch follows COP26, the Department for Transport’s National Bus Strategy; Bus Back Better and the submission of the South Yorkshire Mayoral Combined Authority’s Bus Service Improvement Plan, all of which commit to making public transport better and more accessible. The proposals are funded through the Department for Transport’s Transforming Cities Fund (TCF) and together form part of the Connecting Sheffield programme. The funding is for improvements to travel routes that would help people switch to making journeys by walking, cycling or using public transport, particularly when commuting to work. The South Yorkshire Mayoral Combined Authority was awarded £166m following a successful bid, to share between Sheffield, Rotherham, Doncaster and Barnsley. Sheffield was granted £55m, with an equal share in funding to be used on active travel and public transport improvements across the city. So far, five schemes have been consulted on over the past year. Connecting Sheffield: Abbeydale Road and Ecclesall Road is the final set of proposals to be released through TCF, although further funding will be identified to help continue improvements to the networks for walking, cycling and public transport. The proposals have been developed to help improve journey times from the city centre to Abbeydale Road and Ecclesall Road, where traffic delays can make it difficult for people to rely on bus services. People are invited to comment on the plans, which give buses green light priority across every junction from the city centre to Ecclesall Road South junction with Abbey Lane, and to Abbeydale Road South junction with Sherwood Glen. The council is also asking for initial feedback on proposals to introduce 12-hour bus lanes, and new ways to enforce illegal parking, such as the use of Red Routes. Improvements to bus stops are also included in the plans, including better seating and access to real-time bus updates. Cllr Douglas Johnson, Executive Member for Climate Change, Environment and Transport, said: “We know that it is currently difficult for people to use public transport because buses don’t get priority - they need faster routes to make sure they are consistently reliable. The aim of this scheme is to give buses green light priority, alongside other changes that will make public transport a more attractive option. “Public transport is a critical part of our future; we will need people to catch the bus to take cars off the road. I know it’s been said, but it’s so important I will say it again; we need to make it easier to travel by public transport so people can choose to leave the car at home. This will help reduce traffic congestion, improve the air we breathe, and make us a healthier city. “I would encourage you to have a look at what could change and let us know what you think. If you have any questions or concerns, we would be happy to answer them.” Nigel Eggleton, Managing Director at First South Yorkshire said: ”We welcome the consultation and feedback that will be received on the proposals to introduce bus priority measures in the Abbeydale and Ecclesall Road areas. "Reliability is key in encouraging people to use bus services, as it can provide confidence and reassurance knowing that buses will get people to their destinations on time. "Bus priority, red routes and parking restrictions for vehicles ‘excluding buses’ can make a significant improvement to reliability and make bus services an attractive proposition for people to use, and at the same time help improve air quality and the local environment as less cars will be on the road. We are in full support of any measures that are being proposed to improve the journey experience for our customers who choose to use the bus as their preferred method of travel around the city and county." John Young, Commercial Director at Stagecoach Yorkshire, said: “We welcome the proposals and it's important that bus users' views are heard. We’ve worked closely with our local authority partners to identify bus journey time improvements which will assist punctuality. These are amongst our customers’ top priorities and will help make using the bus more attractive.” The consultation on Connecting Sheffield: Abbeydale Road and Ecclesall Road will run until Thursday 16th December. All comments and feedback will be used to shape the final proposals, which will be consulted on next year. Find out more and have your say here: www.connectingsheffield.commonplace.is/proposals/abbeydale-road-and-ecclesall-road. Comments can be shared via the website, by email info@connecting-sheffield.co.uk or by phone on 0808 196 5105 .

Posted on 17th November 2021

by Sheffield City Council

Next steps to improve neighbourhoods for walking and cycling launched

Proposals to pilot two Active Neighbourhoods in Sheffield have been launched today as residents are asked to help design plans for cleaner, safer, and quieter places to live. Following a successful bid to the Department for Transport’s Active Travel Fund, Crookes and Nether Edge have been identified as areas that could benefit from changes introduced in an Active Neighbourhood. Active Neighbourhoods are an increasingly popular concept which aim to increase road safety and encourage more active lifestyles by reducing and slowing down traffic in an area, so that people feel able to walk and cycle safely and generally enjoy spending more time outdoors. The consultation will ask people what changes they think would help move traffic away from specific streets in their area and create a better environment for active travel. Cllr Douglas Johnson, Executive Member for Climate Change, Environment and Transport, said: “It is becoming increasingly important that people feel they have the option to walk and cycle, especially when it comes down to making short journeys in their local area - whether it be to school, the local shops or work. “We need to start seeing change in travel habits for the environment and people’s own health. Active Neighbourhoods are a positive move forward in the right direction and will help people to start to make small changes where they can.” Information on how you can help shape the future of the Nether Edge and Crookes can be found on the Connecting Sheffield website where you can get involved and share your views. Cllr Johnson added: “The idea is that the involvement from local people on the Active Neighbourhoods is more than just sharing views for consideration; we want residents to help design what their local communities can look like. We know people living and working in Nether Edge and Crookes know the area best and can help shape the plans so that the right changes are put in place.” The Active Travel Fund is the latest round of funding from Government to help improve walking and cycling routes in areas where changes can be made quickly and are likely to see a positive impact and uptake. All changes under the Active Travel Fund need to be in place by March 2022. The £3.2m investment for Sheffield will be used to deliver two active neighbourhoods and to fund improvements to the Sheaf Valley Cycle Route. Through previous engagement on the SCR Active Travel Map and the Connecting Sheffield Heatmap, an improved cycle route along the Sheaf Valley has been identified. The Sheaf Valley Cycle Route will therefore extend from the city centre to the bottom of Woodseats Road via Shoreham Street and Little London Road. These enhanced cycle routes are designed to help make cycling a more desirable and accessible travel option. Dame Sarah Storey, Active Travel Commissioner for the Sheffield City Region, said: “The benefits of Active Neighbourhoods are already well known in Kelham Island, so it’s great to see Sheffield are moving swiftly to bringing these benefits to other areas. The proposals for Nether Edge and Crookes are looking really strong and these can now be shaped by the residents and communities themselves. This is a fantastic opportunity for people in these areas to share their thoughts and views, which I know will be welcome after we received a high number of comments from these areas on our interactive map. “I really hope the community embrace this step of the process and look forward to seeing more neighbourhoods created that are safe for all.” Consultation on the Active Neighbourhoods and the Sheaf Valley Cycle Route is now live and can be found on the Connecting Sheffield website.

Posted on 16th July 2021

by Connecting Sheffield

Transformational plans for sustainable travel in Attercliffe and Darnall

Consultation has launched today on proposals for Darnall and Attercliffe, to provide better walking and cycling routes and priority bus lanes to help improve journey time. This latest sets of plans are part of Connecting Sheffield, a project focused on improving active travel infrastructure in Sheffield, which is funded by the Government’s Transforming Cities Fund, which was bid for and won by Sheffield City Region. The scheme would transform access to the growing employment, leisure and housing opportunities in Darnall, Attercliffe and the Lower Don Valley. The consultation for Darnall – Attercliffe – City Centre reveals plans for a largely segregated cycle route between the city centre, Darnall and Attercliffe and improved walking infrastructure through safer crossings, continuous footpaths, and better paving. There are also a number of new bus lanes planned including along Meadowhall Road towards Meadowhall Interchange, between Arena Square Roundabout and Coleridge Road, and along Handsworth Road. Details of the proposed changes can be found in the consultation which is available for feedback. This scheme follows previous consultations, including plans for the city centre, Neepsend – Kelham, Magna – Tinsley and Nether Edge, which focus on the step change needed for the future of travel in Sheffield to help ease congestion, improve air quality and contribute to climate change. Cllr Julie Grocutt, Cabinet Member for Transport and Development at Sheffield City Council, said: “Once again, we are asking people to share their thoughts on proposals to improve the routes available for walking, cycling and for buses. Hopefully, it is becoming apparent how important it is how we travel, that we choose sustainable transport, walking and cycling where it is possible. “We know that travel by bus is different at the moment because of coronavirus restrictions and safer travel guidance, but public transport is vital to the daily routines of many people, and we want everyone to feel confident to choose to travel by bus and tram in the future. We know that for people to make greener travel choices we need to make it easier. “We hope that residents and businesses welcome the plans for Darnall and Attercliffe, but if there are any questions or concerns we’re asking that they are raised through the consultation. This can be done through the website, by email, by phone or in writing.” The cycle route for this scheme would connect to the existing ‘Grey to Green’ cycle route running along Castlegate and Bridge Street, and the proposed cycle route in the Connecting Sheffield: Neepsend – Kelham – City Centre scheme. There are plans to eventually link to other schemes when the funding is made available. Schemes funded by The Transforming Cities Fund mark the first steps in the Connecting Sheffield project which aims to improve routes for cycling, walking and public transport. Changes that need to be made to accommodate the future of travel in the city, to help ease congestion, improve air quality and to help people to live a healthier lifestyle. The full consultation for Darnall – Attercliffe – City Centre can be found here . You can also feedback your comments or request hard copy information by email: info@connecting-sheffield.co.uk, by phone: 0808 196 5105 or in writing: Freepost, Connecting SHF.

Posted on 19th March 2021

by Connecting Sheffield

Further steps to improve active travel launched for the city

The latest proposals, which sit under the Connecting Sheffield project, reveal plans for safer cycling and better walking routes from the City Centre to Broomhall and towards Nether Edge. Nether Edge – City Centre is the fourth in a series of schemes that are funded by the Transforming Cities Fund, funding bid for and won by Sheffield City Region from the government’s Department for Transport. In line with national priorities to change how people travel, the funding can only be used for active travel and public transport improvements in areas where opportunities to increase access to employment have been identified. Nether Edge was recognised as an area where cycling and walking would be quicker and more convenient for many people to make journeys into the city centre. The Sheffield City Council Transport Strategy published in 2019 also found that there is a significant opportunity to reduce the number of commutes by car from the Nether Edge area to the City Centre by improving active travel infrastructure, such as introducing new cycle lanes. Proposals for the area include safe and easy to follow cycling routes from Nether Edge through Sharrow and Broomhall to the City Centre and the universities for better walking routes to the city centre with safe crossing points, and changes that pave the way for a ‘school street’ around Porter Croft Primary. A ‘School Street’ means that traffic is restricted at drop off and pick-up times so that it is a healthier and safer environment for walking and cycling to school. Cllr Julie Grocutt, Cabinet Member for Transport and Development at Sheffield City Council, said: “The plans for Nether Edge into the City Centre are an exciting development in our journey to creating better routes for walking and cycling. The changes we are making are necessary for the future of travel in the city, not just for us but for our children. We know it won’t happen overnight, it will be a slow process, but our Connecting Sheffield scheme is making a strong start.” The Nether Edge – City Centre plans, which propose new segregated cycle routes, could require the replacement of up to 30 trees to allow for the cycle path, with new trees being planted nearby. While the route has been designed to achieve the most effective route for cycling, the final plans will depend on the outcome of the consultation. Cllr Grocutt added: “We will work with residents and local interest groups to make sure we can get the best possible results with the funding and space available in the community, and the plans will be shaped by the feedback from these discussions and the consultation results. “I recommend that people read the full proposals and let us know what you think. You can also let us know if you have any questions or concerns by email, phone call or in writing.” Dame Sarah Storey, Active Travel Commissioner for the Sheffield City Region, said: “I am pleased to see this new piece of segregated active travel lane in Nether Edge which is part of the active neighbourhood strategy. We’ve had lots of comments on our interactive map about cycling and walking on Wostenholme Road and Washington Street, especially from cyclists who don’t feel safe in peak time traffic. Segregation here will provide a far more appealing route for cycling and leaves the footways for pedestrians who will also benefit from not being so close to traffic fumes.” The Transforming Cities Fund schemes mark the first steps in the Connecting Sheffield project which aims to improve routes for cycling, walking and public transport. Changes that need to be made to accommodate the future of travel in the city, to help ease congestion, improve air quality and to help people to live a healthier lifestyle. The full consultation for Nether Edge can be found on the Connecting Sheffield here . You can also feedback your comments, or request hard copy information by email: info@connecting-sheffield.co.uk, by phone: 0808 196 5105 or in writing: Freepost, Connecting SHF.

Posted on 10th March 2021

by Connecting Sheffield

Plans unveiled for iconic new city centre park

Sheffield City Council is showcasing new proposals for Pound’s Park, a landmark new public space within the Heart of the City scheme, which continues the city centre’s move towards a greener, more sustainable and people-focused destination. Named after Sheffield’s first Chief Fire Officer, Superintendent John Charles Pound, Pound’s Park would be located on the former fire station site between Rockingham Street, Wellington Street and Carver Street. In 2018, the site was originally earmarked for a multi-storey car park, hotel and over 150,000 sq ft of office space. However, a forward-thinking change in approach has led the Council to update its plans to create something entirely more bespoke to Sheffield – a large urban park that closely aligns to the city’s evolving sustainable transport and environmental ambitions – alongside two new smaller development plots. The Council will be inviting interest later this year from private developers to take forward the two smaller development plots – located on the north and south boundaries of the site. Pound’s Park is partly funded by The Transforming Cities Fund (TCF), funding that was bid for and won by Sheffield City Region from the Department for Transport, and the Getting Building Fund. Councillor Mazher Iqbal, Cabinet Member for Business and Investment at Sheffield City Council, said: “We are very excited and proud to unveil these latest plans for Heart of the City. “The scheme is transforming Sheffield city centre, creating new places to live, work, shop and socialise. Alongside the new and repurposed buildings, we understand the importance of introducing more attractive outdoor spaces for everyone to enjoy. “Pound’s Park will be a beautifully designed public space of real quality – one of the most significant city centre parks in the country. It will provide a new focal point for families, prioritise walking and cycling over cars, and help improve both the physical and mental wellbeing of city centre visitors, workers and residents.” The park would provide a short and highly accessible link between the planned new area of bus stops on Rockingham Street, which was part of the recently announced Connecting Sheffield proposals, and the wider city centre. A straight walk of around 200 paces will take people from the bus stops to the back of John Lewis. The area on and around Rockingham Street would be transformed into a safe and well-lit space with footfall and activity well into the evening. In addition to improving the public spaces, the Council is keen for Sheffield to set a new benchmark in city centre walking and cycling infrastructure – to help encourage more sustainable and environmentally-conscious modes of transport. Although not part of this planning application, a large cycle hub is currently being planned at the southern side of Pound’s Park, as part of the modernisation of the Wellington Street car park at Telephone House. Councillor Julie Grocutt, Cabinet Member for Transport and Development at Sheffield City Council added: “In Sheffield we have developed a truly distinctive and high-quality public realm in the city centre, through our Grey to Green scheme and in areas such as Charter Square. “Pound’s Park will see a continuation of this quality, helping us to create a strong sense of character and connection across the whole city centre. Trees and planting will remain a key feature, being used extensively to provide colour and seasonal interest, increase biodiversity, and provide sustainable management of rainwater. “Our plans are ambitious and will reinvent the expectations of a city park, with a special focus on incorporating a multitude of experiences for playing, relaxation and socialising.” Chief Fire Officer at South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue, Alex Johnson, said: “I know that our old headquarters on Wellington Street were a much loved place of work for many current and former members of staff and it feels fitting for this proposed green space to retain some connection with its past by being named in this way. The fire and rescue service is also rightly proud of its long and illustrious heritage and we would feel honoured for the park to be named after the city’s first Chief Fire Officer.” The new public amenity will also provide an accessible new home for the William Mitchell frieze, which was removed from Burgess House last year in preparation for the construction of the new Radisson Blu hotel on Pinstone Street. This prominent new location will help celebrate the frieze and allow for it to be enjoyed by more people. A public consultation on Pound’s Park is now live . You can view the proposals and contribute feedback here , prior to the Council submitting its planning application. The consultation will close on 24th March 2021.

Posted on 10th March 2021

by Connecting Sheffield

Plans revealed for first Active Neighbourhood in Sheffield

Proposals to create an Active Neighbourhood in the Kelham and Neepsend area are launched today so that people can have their say on the plans. The proposals are part of the Council’s Connecting Sheffield ‘Kelham – Neepsend – City Centre’ project to improve sustainable travel, create safer and more attractive travel routes into and around the area. Notably for walking, cycling and to make bus routes quicker and more direct. As part of the project, an Active Neighbourhood is proposed, which would be established by stopping cars taking short cuts through the area. The reduction in traffic is mainly created by road closures, which prevent cars cutting through whilst allowing access for businesses, residents, and visitors. Evidence shared by other places across the country show that Active Neighbourhoods, also known as Low Traffic Neighbourhoods, see more people walking and cycling around the area as a safer and healthier environment is created. The plans for the area also feature a priority bus route to improve travel time to the city centre and a largely segregated lane for cycling, as well as Sheffield’s first ‘Dutch-style’ roundabout and improvements for pedestrians that include a continuous foot path through Burngreave as far as Abbeyfield Park. Detailed information on the changes can be found on the Connecting Sheffield website here. Cllr Julie Grocutt, Cabinet Member for Transport and Development at Sheffield City Council, said: “Neepsend and Kelham are much loved areas, with their industrial background and mix of great shops, bars and restaurants. Stopping unnecessary journeys through the area will help to establish the area as a safer, healthier, and vibrant place to live, work and visit. “Some of the proposed changes have already been in place through the last few months as part of emergency social distancing and active travel measures, and we have seen a positive response to them so far. I’d like to encourage residents and visitors to the area to feedback on what is and isn’t working so that we can use this information to help shape the permanent plans. “I am excited about the proposals for the area which feature new initiatives that haven’t been tried in the city before. We recognise that change can have its issues, and we need to make sure that any schemes put in place are practical and beneficial to residents and visitors. Therefore. we’re asking for as many people as possible to look at the plans and to share your views with us.” Dan Jarvis, Mayor of the Sheffield City Region, said: “Improving transport connectivity across South Yorkshire is crucial to our future prosperity, and has been one of my top priorities since becoming Mayor. “After securing £166m in Transforming Cities Fund investment for the region, I’m pleased that we are enabling people to make more journeys on foot and by bike, to and from work and leisure. This scheme is a great example of how we can create more sustainable and active travel routes across Sheffield. “This will not only benefit the health of our residents, but also help address the climate crisis. I’m determined to build a stronger, greener and fairer future for South Yorkshire and investment in our better public transport is critical to this mission.” Dame Sarah Storey, Sheffield City Region Active Travel Commissioner, said: "It is fantastic to see the plans for this ambitious scheme being shared. Sheffield City Council have done a brilliant job to include their first Dutch-style roundabout and develop connected routes from the trial scheme that was introduced at Kelham Island last year. “Connected and continuous infrastructure, with priority crossings for people walking and cycling, ensure that journeys via active modes no longer have to suffer the usual delay and inconvenience, and are crucial to enabling people to leave their cars behind for short, everyday journeys." The proposals are part of the Council’s Connecting Sheffield scheme, which focuses on adapting the city’s infrastructure for the future, to allow for walking, cycling and public transport to be the first choice of travel, from commuting to work to meeting friends. This scheme will help to improve congestion and air quality, as well as encourage a healthier lifestyle, and create more opportunities in work and education. It follows the City Centre consultation which closed on 7th January. This first phase of the Connecting Sheffield project is funded by the Transforming Cities Fund. The Transforming Cities Fund is a pot of money bid for and won by the Sheffield City Region from the government’s Department of Transport. The funding can only be used in areas where there is the opportunity to increase access to work and productivity, in areas of high employment. ‘City Centre’ and ‘Kelham – Neepsend - City Centre’ are two of six schemes that will be financed by the Transforming Cities Fund. Details on the remaining plans will be shared for consultation later this year. The full consultation for Kelham – Neepsend - City Centre can be found on the Connecting Sheffield website here: http://bit.ly/Neepsend-Kelham You can also feedback your comments or request hard copy information by email: info@connecting-sheffield.co.uk, by phone: 0808 196 5105 or in writing: Freepost, Connecting SHF.

Posted on 4th February 2021

by Connecting Sheffield

New improved walking and cycling routes proposed for Tinsley

Plans to improve active travel in and around Tinsley are launched for consultation today. The new scheme, funded by the Government’s Transforming Cities Fund, reveals proposals to improve cycling and walking connections between Meadowhall and Tinsley and provide better access to Rotherham and Sheffield for people travelling from these areas. The latest proposals offer high-quality and safer cycle and walking routes between Tinsley and Meadowhall, a new cycling route to Meadowhall Interchange and the proposed Magna–Tinsley Tram Train Stop and Park & Ride, as well as safer crossing points in the area. Magna–Tinsley is the latest scheme to be launched under Connecting Sheffield, the Council’s project for sustainable travel. Consultation on the plans for City Centre was carried out early this year, and the consultation on Neepsend – Kelham – City Centre plans are also currently underway. The push for improvements to active travel and public transport routes are designed to reduce congestion, improve air quality, encourage a healthier lifestyle, and create better access to opportunities in work and education. Cllr Julie Grocutt, Cabinet Member for Transport and Development at Sheffield City Council, said: “We need to plan for the future of travel in Sheffield, which means making sure we are putting the right infrastructure in place so that people are able to choose to cycle and walk to work, school or just get around the community. “It’s great to see plans developing to help improve walking and cycling routes around Tinsley, which is currently an area where people are quite reliant on driving to get around easily. Not only will the improvements enable people to travel actively between Sheffield, Rotherham and Meadowhall, they will be an asset to the community. It would be great if people could comment on the plans and let us know their views.” The Transforming Cities Fund (TCF) is funding bid for and won by Sheffield City Region from the government’s Department for Transport. TCF it is for active travel and public transport infrastructure (such as bus lanes) only and cannot be used for direct improvements to bus services themselves. The funding must be used in areas where there is the opportunity to increase access to work and productivity. 'Magna–Tinsley’ is the third of six projects that will be financed by the Transforming Cities Fund to be launched for consultation in Sheffield. The full consultation for Magna–Tinsley can be found on the Connecting Sheffield website here . You can also feedback your comments, or request hard copy information by email (info@connecting-sheffield.co.uk), by phone (0808 196 5105) or in writing (Freepost Connecting SHF).

Posted on 17th February 2021

by Connecting Sheffield

Plans to transform travel in the city centre revealed

Proposals to overhaul cycling, walking and public transport infrastructure in Sheffield have launched today as plans for a city centre scheme are shared for public consultation. The proposals, which include the permanent pedestrianisation of Pinstone Street, are designed to make cycling and walking around the city centre easier, and to make bus journeys quicker and more direct. Alongside new bus routes, there will be improvements to the street scene, such as more planting and greenery replicating the much acclaimed ‘’Grey to Green’ schemes, enhancing the city centre spaces that people can enjoy. The project is funded by the £229 million Transforming Cities Fund (TCF) secure by the Sheffield City Region. The fund is part of the Government’s Industrial Strategy, £50 million of the TCF funding is earmarked for schemes that improve walking, cycling and public transport infrastructure, with a view to making active travel and bus journeys a realistic option for more people. The City Centre scheme is the first of a number of projects that will be funded by TCF and will sit under the Connecting Sheffield brand, which is Sheffield City Council’s vision for the future of travel. Connecting Sheffield has a focus on promoting sustainable travel choices that help to ease congestion, combat climate change, improve air quality, and keep people fit and healthy. The plans must be implemented by March 2023 to meet government deadlines. The city centre proposals include: Detailed plans can be found on the Connecting Sheffield website or hard copies can be made available on request by calling 0808 196 5105 or emailing info@connecting-sheffield.co.uk. Cllr Bob Johnson, Cabinet Member for Transport and Sustainability at Sheffield City Council, said: “We are excited to start the conversation on the city centre improvements. We need to start planning for the future of travel, and to do this, changes need to be made. “We have already seen some of the benefits of the proposed changes through emergency active travel measures earlier in the year, which include the closure of Pinstone Street so a lot of people have already had some experience of how the scheme could work. I’d like to encourage everyone to feedback their views as part of this consultation. “We recognise that whilst there are a lot of positives to what we are proposing, there may also be some concerns. We keen to hear from as many people as possible, so please let us know what you think and ask any questions you have.” Feedback on the plans can be given through the website, by email, over the phone or via email at on request by calling 0808 196 5105 or emailing info@connecting-sheffield.co.uk. Leaflets will be posted in and around the city centre to keep businesses and residents updated with the plans. The consultation on the City Centre scheme will run until the 7 January 2021.

Posted on 26th November 2020

by Connecting Sheffield

Council sets out ambitious plans for the future of travel in Sheffield

Sheffield City Council is launching a new project, Connecting Sheffield, which will focus on encouraging active travel and supporting the shift towards sustainable transport in and around the city. Connecting Sheffield will encompass a range of transport schemes focused on delivering change in the city’s walking, cycling and public transport infrastructure. The new scheme follows a successful bid made by Sheffield City Region, supported by Sheffield City Council, for funding from the Department for Transport’s Transforming Cities Fund. Sheffield will receive £50m which will be used to improve public transport, walking and cycling links to encourage people to leave their car at home. The funding will deliver the first major step in the Council’s vision to transform travel in Sheffield and make it possible for more people to choose walking, cycling and public transport first. The reduction in a reliance on car journeys is a priority for the city’s future, not only to help ease congestion but to help address climate change and improve air quality in Sheffield. Future funding will support further schemes brought forward in subsequent phases. Lower traffic levels have been seen during the pandemic as people have taken to walking and cycling on more journeys. It is hoped that this continues, as changes to travel infrastructure are prioritised. The first phase of the project will focus on key areas that have been identified as locations where people are making short car journeys from home to work in the city centre and Lower Down Valley, including Neepsend, Kelham and Nether Edge. The proposed schemes will enable these to be made more safely by cycling, especially for shorter trips, and more quickly and reliably by bus. The Transforming Cities Fund will focus on improving travel links through the following schemes: All of the proposed schemes will be subject to public consultation, and the feedback received will help to inform the development of the routes identified. Under the current terms of the funding from the Department for Transport, all work must be completed by March 2023. Councillor Bob Johnson, Cabinet Member for Transport and Development at Sheffield City Council, said: “Connecting Sheffield is a major first step in overhauling our transport network to put walking, cycling and public transport at the forefront of travel choices available in our city. “We know that for lots of people, travelling by car is sometimes the only feasible way of getting from A to B, but we want to make sure that walking, cycling and public transport offer a realistic option, especially for getting to work and for shorter journeys. “It is disappointing that we did not receive our full bid for funding from the Government. Equally, we could never deliver everything we want to in this first phase. Other schemes will come in later phases. However, these projects still represent a major first step in developing our plans to create a more inclusive and diverse travel network that over time will transform how people move around Sheffield. “Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic we have seen an increase in walking and cycling as people have taken the time to get outdoors and explore both their local communities and our wonderful parks and countryside, and we hope to make it possible for more people to continue to do this. “Despite current restrictions, bus services will also remain a crucial part of our transport infrastructure into the future, helping thousands of people to get about. Although improving travel infrastructure may not seem like a priority right now, this work is vitally important in making sure our transport system is fit for purpose so that people can get to work, access services and visit family and friends now and in the future. We know we have a long way to go to get where we need to be, but we are excited to be able to make a start.” Dan Jarvis, Mayor of the Sheffield City Region, said: “The Transforming Cities Fund will help to achieve our ambition of a transport system for South Yorkshire that is fit for the 21st century. “By enabling walking and cycling, and improving public transport, these Connecting Sheffield schemes will reduce congestion, improve air quality and allow people to live more active lives, which will improve their mental and physical health. “Revolutionising how we travel to include modes which are beneficial to the health of both the planet and our people is vital as we develop a stronger, greener and fairer economy and society for South Yorkshire.” Martin McKervey, Chair of the Sheffield Property Association, said: “Our cities are evolving. Both investors and people living and working in cities are increasingly looking for quality of life, a city that’s easier to get around and people friendly, with a cleaner environment. Sheffield is ideally placed to deliver on this but it needs the right infrastructure in place. That’s why we wholeheartedly support this new vision for Connecting Sheffield and look forward to hearing more about the detailed proposals.”

Posted on 3rd November 2020

by Connecting Sheffield

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